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Dirty, flirtatious memes to annoy your better half with (32 Photos)

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Florence Pugh Slams ”Abuse” About Her & Zach Braff’s Age Difference

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Florence Pugh‘s relationship with Zach Braff is not up for debate. 

In a video posted to Instagram on Wednesday, the Little Women star reacted to receiving what she described as “horrid” and “hateful” comments about Zach and their 21-year age difference. Within “eight minutes” of publicly paying tribute to the actor on his birthday this week, Pugh said “70 percent of the comments [were] hurling abuse and being horrid.” 

The British actress said she was forced to turn off commenting capabilities on her account, adding, “I will not allow that behavior on my page. I’m not about that. It makes me upset. It makes me sad that during this time when we really all need to be together, we need to be supporting one another, we need to be loving one another. The world is aching and the world is dying and a few of you decided to bully for no reason.”

Pugh’s remarks continued, “I’m 24-years-old. I have been working since I was 17-years-old. I have been earning money since I was 17-years-old. I became an adult when I was 18-years-old and I started paying taxes when I was 18-years-old.”

“I do not need you to tell me who I should and should not love, and I would never in my life ever, ever tell someone who they can and cannot love. It is not your place. It has nothing to do with you.”

BACKGRID

Florence and Zach were first romantically linked around this time last year. The couple has shared very little about their relationship, save for the occasional date night or Instagram display of public affection. 

The Midsommar actress then asked critics to simply unfollow her if they weren’t willing to respect her and Zach’s privacy. “The abuse that you throw at him is abuse that you’re throwing at me, and I don’t want those followers… I don’t want that on my page. It’s embarrassing, it’s sad and I don’t know when cyber bullying became trendy.”

Florence’s celebrity admirers applauded her stance, with Ariana Grande commenting, “Oh I love and appreciate [you] so much.” Joey King wrote, “You are simply the coolest,” and model Stefania Ferrario commented, “My partner is 22 years my senior and we have been together almost 7 years. Love is a diverse beautiful thing and I hope more people open their minds up a little more.”

Watch Florence’s message in its entirety above. 





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Here’s How The Bachelor: Listen to Your Heart Works

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Production of The Bachelorette season 16 may be on hold, but have no fear, reality TV lovers. A new Bachelor spinoff is debuting April 13 on ABC, and it’s a lot like Bachelor in Paradise, except there’s no paradise . . . and no Bachelor alums . . . and a lot of singing. Confused? Allow us to explain. In The Bachelor: Listen to Your Heart, single men and women (all of whom are musicians or people who work in music) will live together and go on music-themed dates with each other. As ABC Entertainment President Karey Burke said, “Think The Bachelor in Paradise meets A Star Is Born.”

Through the music-themed dates, participants will attempt to find someone they connect with, and that person will become their new duet partner (though in the beginning, contestants will be allowed to partner-swap). Like Bachelor in Paradise, the couples are formed through “traditional” rose ceremonies, with “women giving roses to the men, and then some men going home, and the men giving roses and some of the women go home.” As Bachelor host Chris Harrison explained during an interview with Parade, “The relationships will come first on Listen to Your Heart, and the music will come second, which means it is not like any of the current competition shows on the air.” ABC has already revealed its cast of 23 contestants so . . . it’s clear that some people aren’t going to find their duet partner for life.

Once the duet pairs are created, the new couple will be tested through musical challenges, such as live performances in front of some of the biggest names in music. And of course, as the season goes on, the audiences and the venues keep getting bigger. Each episode, the show will eliminate couples who seem to have the least amount of chemistry on stage until just one pair remains. However, unlike BIP, proposals aren’t the end goal in this series. “The goal of this is [for] a couple to find true love, but then also have this amazing duet that will earn this prize package that we put together,” Harrison explained. Predictably, he was coy about the details of that prize package.

Harrison also revealed that the series will first take place in an LA ranch before moving on to other locations. “The first kind of big performance is actually at a venue in downtown Los Angeles, then we move over to Las Vegas, and the grand finale is in Nashville,” he said. Several Bachelor Nation couples will guest-judge, including JoJo Fletcher and Jordan Rogers, Rachel Lindsay and Bryan Abasolo, Arie and Lauren Luyendyk Jr., and Kaitlyn Bristowe and Jason Tartick. Celebrity guest judges will include Jason Mraz, Kesha, Toni Braxton, Andy Grammer, Pat Monahan, Ashlee Simpson-Ross, Evan Ross, Rita Wilson, Jewel, and Taye Diggs.

We don’t know whether the series will end with a record contract, an engagement, or nearly as much drama as season 24 of The Bachelor, but we’ll definitely be tuning in to find out!





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“Who Better Than Senator Sanders?”: Inside Bernie Sanders’s Pivot From Candidate to Coronavirus Leader

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Shortly after 11:45 on Wednesday morning, Bernie Sanders announced his exit from the Democratic presidential primary, clearing former Vice President Joe Biden’s path to the nomination. “I cannot in good conscience continue to mount a campaign that cannot win and which would interfere with the important work required of all of us in this difficult hour,” Sanders somberly told his supporters in a livestream address.

“This difficult hour” was a Churchillian reference to the disease that has pushed the issues he’s been fighting for for decades to the center of the national conversation—and also, paradoxically, made his continued presence in the Democratic primary race something that could possibly impede his policy outcomes rather than make them more likely.

Some in the Sanders camp have been resisting this logic, hoping for a miracle scenario, but since his devastating losses on Super Tuesday, many in his world have been coming around to this viewpoint. Sanders’s camp, allies—including, reportedly, his campaign manager, Faiz Shakir, and progressive Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal—had begun urging the senator to stand down.

For the last few weeks in Sanders world, the question was no longer “how do we win this thing?” but rather, “what is the most effective way to address the crisis while advancing a progressive agenda?” Indeed, there is a deep irony in the fact that the coronavirus crisis proved to be his presidential death knell. There has perhaps been no greater endorsement for the progressive policy ideas popularized and amplified by Sanders than COVID-19. In its destruction, the virus has exposed the rot within the U.S. health care system, the lack of a social safety net in America, and the daily vulnerability of millions of Americans. Even as Sanders’s presidential campaign faltered, he’d already repurposed his networks and his rhetoric to address the crisis and reshape the national debate. By the time he withdrew, he’d already moved on.

“Bernie says we want to make sure that we are unified in defeating Donald Trump and that we, especially at a time of the COVID-19 crisis, that we are focused on the wide gulf between how Trump has governed and how the Democrats would govern. We would listen to science, we would listen to the experts and he wants that contrast to be clear,” Congressman Ro Khanna, a co-chair of the Sanders’s campaign, told me. “That gulf has literally been life or death…. I think that when people think about it, they’ll see that yes, there are intraparty debates, but there’s such a gulf of difference between us and how we would have acted in this crisis and how Trump has.”

By the first week in February, Sanders’s policy team had already begun consulting with public health experts on policy proposals to respond to a potential pandemic. And as Super Tuesday approached, coronavirus concerns had taken hold within the campaign, often as a practical problem. Discussions were already underway about how the virus would impact the ability to organize and how to protect staff, volunteers, and supporters. With the first signs of a massive outbreak in the Lombardy region of Italy appearing across the Atlantic, the week before Super Tuesday, the Sanders campaign was in contact with local public health experts about the risks and stopped actively encouraging people to go to the polls to vote, instead urging them to vote by mail. “That was definitely a turning point for us,” Anna Bahr, the national deputy press secretary for the Sanders campaign, told me.

Sanders’s policy arm had already begun thinking beyond politics, about how the crisis could be managed. As other elected officials and talking heads zeroed in on sounding the alarm around an impending shortage of ventilators and personal protective equipment for health care workers, Sanders’s policy team was asking questions about other advanced medical supplies like intensive care unit beds, as well as ripple effects like what happens when millions of Americans lose their jobs and consequently their health care; how those Americans would feed themselves; and how the crisis would impact the millions of people who are uninsured or underinsured.



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