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Funny work-centric images we can all relate to : theCHIVE

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Help break the mundane monotony of your workday by sending in amusing work-related shenanigans of your own!

Send in all your best photos via iChive, OR you can ALSO send pics in through our iPhone & or Android apps to get featured on the site!

Use #workhappens on iCHIVE to help your chances of getting featured in the next themed gallery.



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Will Smith & Tyra Banks Reminisce About Their Time Together On ‘The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air’

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In the spirit of social distancing, Will Smith teamed up with Snapchat to launch his new series “Will From Home,” and one of his first guests was none other than supermodel Tyra Banks.

Will and Tyra teamed up to host an at home fashion show with some fans, but before they could get to business, the two of them went down memory lane and talked about their time together on Will’s hit sitcom “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.”

While talking about their first episode of the show together, Tyra recited her lines to show that she still knows them 30 years later, and then she proceeded to mention that at the time she was only 19-years-old and “Fresh Prince” was her first acting gig ever.

She said, “I had an acting agent, even though I haven’t acted yet, and he was like ‘you gotta go do this audition for ‘The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,’ and you’re gonna be auditioning to play Will Smith’s ex-girlfriend from Philly.’”

Will and Tyra also talked about one particular scene where she had to slap Will. However, they revealed she was supposed to actually miss the slap, but ended up slapping Will for real.”

 

Check out Will & Tyra have a nostalgic moment below:

“The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” would air from 1990-1996, and earned multiple nominations and awards, including the Top TV Award at the 1994 ASCAP Film & Television Music Awards. Even in 2020, the show still remains a classic and has spanned over many generations as it remains globally syndicated.

 

TSR STAFF: Jade Ashley @Jade_Ashley94





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Melissa Etheridge Says Jennifer Aniston, Brad Pitt Will Always Be Pals

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Melissa Etheridge “loved” Jennifer Aniston and Brad Pitt together.

The iconic singer-songwriter couldn’t help but gush over her pals during a virtual appearance on Watch What Happens Live on Monday night. During a game of “Iso-Lay It On Us,” a fan asked Etheridge what she thought of the “hysteria” over Aniston and Pitt’s reunion earlier this year at the 2020 SAG Awards.

In response to the question about the exes, Etheridge—who performed at the celeb duo’s wedding in 2000—laughed and said, “Oh God! I was hoping I could do your show without mentioning her whose name will not be mentioned.”

“Oh, you know what? I loved Brad and Jen together, they were beautiful,” Etheridge went on to share. “I believe they will always remain friends because they’re two very special people that can get through anything. I just hope that their friendship lasts.”

Etheridge also added, “Of course we would always…those were the glory days…I remember those days.”

Pitt and Aniston, who split in 2005, have remained on friendly terms in recent years, with fans hoping for a romantic reunion. However, it seems as though they’re just supportive of one another.

During the same game on WWHL, fellow guests Kristen Johnston revealed what it was like dating Ryan Reynolds back in the ’90s. Describing the relationship in three words, Johnston said, “It was so long ago I forgot, but literally, so nice, great guy lovely. Lovely person.”

Take a look at the video above to see Etheridge and Johnston talk about Aniston, Pitt and Reynolds!

(E! and Bravo are both part of the NBCUniversal family.)





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“We Shouldn’t Rush Into Anything”: Trump’s Timeline for Filling Arenas May Not Match Coronavirus Reality

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When NFL teams select their draft picks later this month, the beaming players won’t get to pose with commissioner Roger Goodell. Another tradition, the onstage bear hug, is definitely out. Instead, video game behemoth EA Sports will create a “virtual moment” of each player walking on stage and interacting with the commissioner—slightly less dazzling than the original plan to have Goodell read the picks on a floating stage in front of the Bellagio’s iconic fountains.

Either way, there will be no fans on hand to cheer—or, if you’re a New York Jets diehard, boo—their team’s selections since the league nixed its plans to hold the draft publicly. More than 600,000 fans attended last year’s draft over the three days in Nashville, and some expected this year’s spectacle in Las Vegas to top that. “That’s what I’ll miss, seeing the fans’ excitement, and at times disappointment and/or shock,” Trey Wingo, anchor of ESPN’s draft coverage, told me. “That kind of juice is what makes the draft every year.”

President Donald Trump said Saturday that he hopes to have sports fans back in arenas by August, the same month he’ll take the stage at the Republican National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. “They want to see basketball and baseball and football and hockey,” he said at a White House briefing. “They want to see their sports. They want to go out onto the golf courses and breathe nice, clean, beautiful fresh air.” But just as Trump’s “beautiful” timeline for opening the U.S. economy on Easter was overly ambitious, it’s hard to see tens of thousands of Americans gathering in the coming months given the rapid spread of coronavirus, a surging death toll, and no immediate vaccine to prevent subsequent outbreaks.

The anticipation for this year’s NFL Draft, scheduled from April 23-25, could be even greater than usual, given that fans have been resigned to watching replays of old games since the major sports leagues suspended play in mid-March. A spokesman for the NFL told me that the league is “still knee-deep in the planning stages of what this year’s draft will look like,” but Wingo said his own preparation for the draft “has not changed at all,” even if the picks will be presented in a different way. “It will be the only live sporting event fans can consume,” Wingo said, “and I think that will really bring a special feel to the night.”

It has never felt so strange to see two people hug, a vestige of an era that ended way back in the bygone days of three weeks ago, a now-forbidden gesture more likely to evoke a wince than any feelings of warmth. Two characters embracing in a movie, a video clip of teammates clutching each other in triumph, a wedding photo showing a radiant couple—it’s all suddenly, weirdly, dated. The COVID-19 pandemic has made anachronisms out of many customs that didn’t warrant a second glance last month; namely, anything that involves physical contact or a breach of the sacred six-feet barrier.

That point was crystallized as I read this past weekend about a 51-year-old woman in my South Dakota hometown who died suddenly from the coronavirus. Her family is now left to grieve in isolation, and wait for a less precarious time to hold a memorial service. The condolences have come in the form of phone calls, but as the widower said: “There’s nothing to replace a hug.”

What becomes of America’s cultural rituals and traditions as hugs, high fives, and handshakes are curbed by social distancing? The presidential race, for one, is now largely confined to the computer screen. Late-night hosts are performing monologues from their homes as movie premieres are postponed. And stadiums sit empty, even as the president calls up sports commissioners in hopes of speeding things along.





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