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No Reduced Bail for Suspect in Kenosha Vaping Operation – NBC Chicago

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A Wisconsin judge refused Friday to lower the bond of a man suspected of running an illegal operation to manufacture thousands of vaping cartridges filled with THC.

Tyler Huffhines is being held on $500,000 bond since his Sept. 5 arrest on charges of maintaining a drug trafficking house and three counts of possession with intent to deliver THC.

Authorities also arrested Huffhines’ brother, Jacob and their mother, Courtney Huffhines.

The Kenosha News reports Courtney Huffhines posted $100,000 bail and is currently not in custody.

Prosecutors allege Tyler Huffhines ran his operation with the help of his mother and brother.





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Gresham: Residential burglaries reported in January, Chicago police

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Chicago police are warning of three residential burglaries reported in January in Gresham on the South Side.

In each incident, someone breaks into residences through an opened window or side door, Chicago police said in a community alert. Once inside they stole vehicle keys, then the vehicle and in one incident they stole photography equipment.

The burglaries happened:

  • Between 10 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Jan. 7, in the 7500 block of South Damen Avenue;
  • Between 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Jan. 14, in the 7700 block of South Damen Avenue; and
  • Between 4 a.m. and 5 p.m. Jan 14, in the 7600 block of South Damen Avenue.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Area South detectives at 312-747-8273.

Read more on crime, and track the city’s homicides.



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Humboldt Park tenants win affordable housing fight to keep Section 8 housing, but gentrification concerns remain

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Like many areas facing gentrification, rents and home prices in Humboldt Park are rising.

A group of renters in the Northwest Side neighborhood has been fighting for months to stay in their homes, and they’ve finally found some success.

RELATED: What is affordable housing?
The win comes as they watch the community they’ve lived in for most of their lives change before their eyes.

Paseo Boricua in Humboldt Park, known for decades as the center of Chicago’s Puerto Rican community and culture, is capped by steel flags at either end of Division between Western and California avenues.

There, Andriana Vera and the other tenants in her building played loteria and celebrated a win.

“We’re feeling excited because we’re definitely going to be staying there for some time. But definitely the fight isn’t over,” Vera said.

She and the other renters in their building won a legal fight that started in 2019 to keep their homes Section 8 affordable housing. They can now afford to stay where they live.

RELATED: Affordable housing resource guide

But that win may be the exception, not the rule.

“In the beginning this was predominantly a Puerto Rican neighborhood,” said Cafe Colao Owner Wanda Colon, who has run the coffee shop on division for nearly 20 years. “Within the past 10 years I will say that my customer base now has shifted. Where I have 50 percent American, Caucasian, and the other 50 percent still Latino, not predominantly Puerto Rican.”

Community research from UIC’s Nathalie P. Voorhees Center for Neighborhood and Community Improvement bears out the fact that gentrification, defined as affluent outside investment, in Humboldt Park is driving up home prices and driving out longtime residents.

“So you have families now where their income hasn’t gone up but their taxes have gone up,” said Voorhees Center Co-Director Janet Smith. “And so they’re struggling to be able to keep that home and they make decisions on where they can move, maybe say ‘I can’t stay.'”

Many Humboldt Park residents said investment in the community isn’t a bad thing. The problem is when million dollar homes and luxury apartments and condos price out the residents who have been living there for generations.

“There’s no more vacant lots and they’re all taken over by half a million dollar homes or condos. It’s not for us,” Vera said.

According to Smith, some potential solutions include giving tax breaks to long-time residents to counteract those rising property taxes, potential tax breaks to landlords who keep their rents affordable, and rent stabilization laws tied to inflation to keep rents from rising astronomically and quickly.

“I don’t want to have to be in 20 years telling my daughter, ‘I used to be in Humboldt Park, that beautiful place up north that’s now just full of beautiful houses and we cannot live there because we can’t afford it.’ I want to be able to be here and show her what I grew up with,” Vera said.

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3 Cases of Legionnaires’ Reported at Carol Stream Retirement Community – NBC Chicago

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Health officials are investigating after three cases of Legionnaires’ disease, two of them fatal, were reported at a retirement community in west suburban Carol Stream.

The cases have sprung up since May 2019 at the Covenant Living at Windsor Park retirement community, 124 Windsor Park Drive, according to a statement from the DuPage County Health Department.

Two residents died from a combination of the disease and other underlying medical conditions, according to Health Department spokesman Don Bolger.

The department and the Illinois Department of Public Health are working with the facility to investigate the cases, officials said.

Windsor Park is also investigating and is “taking action based on its water management plan and implementing multiple control measures,” including flushing the plumbing system, officials said.

Windsor Park is also working to inform residents who may be affected and following IDPH recommendations for identifying other potential cases and ensuring appropriate testing and clinical management, officials said.

The cases are believed to be unrelated to each other, according to a statement from Covenant Living at Windsor Park.

“Covenant Living at Windsor Park has a resident residing in skilled nursing who was admitted from outside the community and tested positive for the Legionella bacteria,” the statement said. “Our prayers are with this individual at this time. Since this past May, we had two other cases and sadly, the individuals passed away of complications from multiple other illnesses and did test positive for the Legionella bacteria. Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with their families.”

The disease is caused by Legionella bacteria, which occur naturally, according to the CDC. Most healthy people won’t fall ill after exposure, but it can cause a serious lung infection.

While it is not usually spread person-to-person, outbreaks are commonly associated with buildings or structures that have complex water systems, the CDC said.





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